November 27, 2022

The shirt worn by Argentine football legend Diego Armando Maradona when he scored two famous goals against England in the quarter-finals of the 1986 World Cup will be on display in Qatar during the 2022 World Cup, five months after it was sold for approximately $9.3 million. The auction, according to Agence France-Presse, today is Saturday.

The T-shirt, which at the time broke all records for selling sports collectibles without revealing the identity of the buyer, will be loaned to the Qatar Sports Museum until April 1, according to auction house Sotheby’s.

Sheikha Al Mayassa bint Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani, Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Qatar Museums, sister of the Emir of Qatar, expressed her joy to borrow the T-shirt as part of an exhibition dedicated to the history of football and the World Cup. . “This shirt has come a long way,” she told AFP in a statement.

And she continued, “Many of the items on display at the Qatar 3-2-1 Olympic Museum and Sports Museum are symbols of human passion with long, influential stories.”

In addition to Maradona’s jersey, the museum will display the ball from the first World Cup final in 1930, the first manuscript of the rules of football, and a bronze from the right foot of the Brazilian star Pelé.

The museum was opened at the end of March last year at the Khalifa Stadium, one of the eight stadiums hosting the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar from November 20 to December 18.

And Argentine collector Marcelo Ordaz, after selling the shirt last May to La Nacion TV in his country, said he was “unfortunately” unable to offer $6.8 million in the face of “an offer from the Middle East that arrived at the last minute.” .

He added that he had failed in his quest despite “very big efforts” and the help of “many contract goals” such as Barcelona defender Gerard Piqué and Argentine Football Association president Claudio Tapia who wanted to help him “in getting that shirt back.” to share with all Argentines.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.